How to Blog Comment Your Way to Consistent Traffic Growth

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Have you left a valuable blog comment today?

What about this week?

How you commented on a blog this month?

Have you ever commented on a blog before?

No… Why not?   Too busy? Don’t understand why you should? Scared?

Maybe it’s just that you don’t realize how important commenting on other blogs is to traffic growth.

Today I’m going to teach you how a Blog Comment Strategy can Drive Consistent Traffic Growth

But first let’s talk about HOW to properly leave a blog comment:

Blog Commenting for Traffic Growth

(This is the standard blog comment form you’ll see on WordPress blogs.  Most comment platforms use a similar structure)

1) Enter Name

This is where you put your name.  Use your entire name (i.e. I use Ryan Hanley).  Make sure that your name is spelled correctly and you use the appropriate capitalization.

This is your first impression to the blog owner and anyone else that reads your comment.  If you name is misspelled or not properly capitalized or USES KEYWORDS then there is a very good chance your comment is going to sent to Trash or SPAM and certainly won’t be taken seriously.

2) Enter Email Address

This is where your email goes… Pretty straight-forward… Use an email address you actually check because the blog owner may want to contact you as follow-up to your comment.

3) Enter Blog Link

IMPORTANT -  This is your opportunity to place a link back to you website.  This is the first page that any potential visitors are going to see.  This does not have to be you homepage.  I use http://www.RyanHanley.com/Ryan-Hanley/ (which is my About Page) on many blogs I comment on.  I do this so that anyone who enjoys my blog comment and wants to find out more about me cab get a good idea of who I am right away.

4) Enter Blog Comment

We’re going to talk about this section more in a minute but inside this big box is where you leave your comment.  Keep reading for more on how to leave an awesome comment that generates blog traffic.

5) CommentLuv

On many very cool blogs you will see a CommentLuv button.  CommentLuv allows you to add an additional link to your blog comments from your RSS Feed. (Important note, when leaving a comment with CommentLuv use your homepage address in link box from #3 otherwise CommentLuv will not be able to pull your RSS Feed)

Blog Comment CommentLuv

6) You’re Not a Spammer

Most blogs will have some sort of SPAM protection and you will need to check off that you are NOT a Spammer.  On this blog I use Growmap Anti Spambot Plugin.

7) Additional Options and Features

Many blogs will offer individuals who leave a blog comment additional options or features.  Options include subscribing to comments, receiving a free information product or subscribing to blog updates. Check them off if you wish.

Just Be Awesome Blog Comment

So we’ve talked about Just Be Awesome SEO and Just Be Awesome Social Media… Now it’s time to talk about Just Be Awesome Blog Commenting.

When it comes to generating consistent traffic growth your blog comment strategy is no different than SEO or social media… It’s all about adding value and being awesome!

I hope you weren’t reading this for some link building strategy…

If so, I’m about to disappoint you.

No Garbage Blog CommentsJust Be Awesome Blog Commenting isn’t about link building…

…it’s about VALUE BUILDING.

Blog comments afford you the opportunity to quickly and easily spread your valuable ideas and expertise throughout the Internet. | Click to Tweet

Most of us don’t have time to Guest Post on a consistent basis.

But it takes a faction of the time to blog comment.

Blog Comment Garbage

Do NOT… PLEASE DO NOT just write “Great Post” or “Good Stuff” and move on.

Know what I do with comments that start and finish with “Great Post” or “Good Stuff”?

TRASH!

Yup… I put the garbage where it belongs… in the TRASH!

Why do “Great Post” and “Good Stuff” comments go in the trash?

Because they’re worthless.  That comment which took NO THOUGHT… Adds NO VALUE to my blog.

As a blog commentor you have the same responsibility to add value to my blog with your comment as I do with my blog post.

Let that thought sink in for minute.

You have a RESPONSIBILITY to add value with your Blog Comment… | Click to Tweet

or…

…your blog comment deserves to be thrown in the garbage.

How to Add Blog Comment Value

How do we get our blog comments noticed?

Easy… add value.

Here are five of many ways to add value through a blog comment:

  1. Put thought into what you’re saying
  2. Add personal experience to blog topic
  3. Ask blog author questions
  4. Consistently contribute
  5. Reply to other commentors directly

How hard do any of the concepts seem?

Not hard right?

#1 –  Put thought into what you’re saying

It seems crazy that you would actually have to put thought into your comment… I know you just want the link back to your website.  But Just Be Awesome Blog Commenting is about building consistent traffic growth and build consistent traffic growth through blog commenting by writing comments that people react to.

If you leave a valuable awesome comment on another blog every one who reads through the comments of that blog post (and more people do than you would think) is going get a little taste of just how awesome you are…

And want more!

#2 – Add personal experience to blog topic

A big part of Just Be Awesome Blog Commenting is connecting with the blog owner.  There is nothing that a blogger loves more to know his/her writing is connecting with readers on a personal level.

This is how relationships are born

#3 – Ask blog author questions

We’re directly addressing the blog authors ego with this one.  When you ask questions in the comment section the blog author gets to further demonstrate their expertise in the comment section and they will love you for that.

This is another way that relationships are born…

#4 – Consistently contribute

Commenting on a blog and never returning is going to get you nowhere.  Consistently showing your face on a blog and adding value to the community shows that you care and are invested in the content.  People will notice this… And want to know more about you.

#5 - Reply to other commentors directly

This is one that I have had so much success with I almost didn’t include it because of how powerful a traffic builder it can be… Let me explain.

You read a blog comment that is very well written and well thought out.  You then reply to that comment (you don’t leave a new comment with RE: or @ and the person’s name) directly adding to their thoughts or asking the blog commentor a question.

This creates a blog comment chain and as people add comments each comment gets indented farther which in turn draws the attention of more commentors because they see a valuable conversation taking place and want to be a part of it.

The blog owner loves all the attention and so does the commentor you replied to and they all want to know more about YOU!

The Rub

I’ve done a very unofficial test of how long it takes me to read an average blog post and write a well thought out response in the comments… ~5 minutes on average.

If it takes you two hours to write a well thought out blog post… That’s 120 minutes… Technically, you could 24 well thought out blog comments in the same amount of time.  In reality it would probably be less but you get the point…

You can hit more communities in the same amount of time.

Finding quality blogs to comment on is another question I get…

I use Google RSS Reader to track ~35 blogs I find to be awesome.  This tool allows me to easily scan these blogs for posts I want to read and comment on.

I highly recommend Just Be Awesome Blog Commenting…

Thank you and Good luck,

I am Ryan Hanley and this is Content Warfare.

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  • Nice post Ryan, but don’t you think that blog commenting is more for SEO purposes than actually getting traffic purposes. I use commenting for promotional methods but most of the time I get very small actual numbers from the comments themselves, and I find I end up only commenting for the link as opposed to the social side of it. What do you reckon?
    Tom.

  • It’s great reading posts like this, Ryan. When I first started in online marketing for my virtual assistant business, I made liberal use of blog commenting and had great results. But I fell out of it sadly. This has definitely renewed my commitment to this and I’ll be going all out again.

    Thanks for creating such comment-able content too and growing a community like this. I can imagine how much work and hustle it took to get here!
    A taste of Jeff Machado’s work: Storytelling and Social Media: An Inside Look at Proof Eyewear’s Online Success

  • hi kerala, how are you caring on. i thin you are right. without any good research nobody can not write anything vastly. Ryan Hanley is avery hard working guy and he knows how to take a research any topic very well.

  • What is your view on leaving comments that use your company’s name instead of your actual name, especially if the comment is the company’s opinion and not the individual’s?

    For example, no one gives a rats rectum what “Joe Blow” has to say about banning sugar sodas from movie theater concession stands but you might be more interested if the opinion was written by the Coca-Cola Corporation. See my point?

    Anyway, do you have an opinion on this matter?

    • Ken,

      I trash or spam any comment left on my blog that isn’t a human beings name, because human’s write comments not corporations.

      Now if you’re writing the opinion of a Corporation then stating so in your Comment is a great idea and is definitely going to add weight. But I want to know the person leaving the comment.

      Thanks!!

  • Ryan,
    “Thanks for the great post” really!
    Blog commenting, blog reading and post writing are the “holy blog trinity”.
    I find that commenting is a multi-level experience and reading others comments equally valuable as the original article. The different angles and experiences usually help generate ideas.
    You 5 minute rule is probably correct.

  • Hey Ryan

    People mostly trying to open there account on Dofollow blogs and with same anchor text to target there keywords but I think it’s better way to use alternate anchor and mix blogs like dofollow and nofollow for getting maximum search engine advantage and for getting traffic point of view comment luv blogs are best way to get Rss Feed xml parse post title and it will also give one backlink pointing towards your blogs.
    A taste of Rizwan Sultan’s work: Free Cool Games

  • Harrison,

    It might only be coincidence that is happening or it might be that your writing style just fits a shorter post… If it continues to happen and traffic is what you’re looking for then I would stick with the shorter posts!

    Thanks bud,

    Ryan H.

  • Laura,

    That is what networking is all about… Getting to know people trying in whatever way to add value to each other’s lives and business.

    So glad you stopped by!

    Ryan H.

  • Hey Ryan

    First off I have to say thank you! I’m rather new to all this SEO & inbound link stuff, so this was extremely helpful. I figured out that I could get inbound links from blog posts but have to admit I felt like a spammer. It’s easy to think you are adding a thoughtful opinion but honestly thinking back for some posts I was adding just about as much value as saying “Great Post!”

    It seems as though beginners sort of do what they see others doing and unfortunately there are too many people just putting “Nice Job” and so on. Hopefully more individuals run into this post so we can get out of our spammy marketing ways!

    Just one questions Ryan. Do you always find the most value linking the blog comments back to your About Page, or do you sometimes link it to your blog or other pages?

    Thanks!
    A taste of Zachary Emly’s work: 5 risk management strategies your business should consider

    • Zach,

      GREAT QUESTION!

      I link to all different pages… Most of the time I like to my Homepage… But I also do my About Page probably 25% of the time and if I’m referencing something in the comment I’ll link to that specific page… So You can link wherever you want people first contact with you to be!

      You could even create a specific page for people coming from comments!!

      Thanks!

  • Hey Ryan, I started writing this comment and put “great post” haha. Had to delete that. And I know I have done that more times than I prefer to admit. Although it is a great post, you’re right, it isn’t adding any value .

    You bring up some great points though. I especially like the idea of linking to your about page. Usually people are interested in knowing more about the person who posted a topic. Not their website per say. I’ll have to give that tip a try.

    Thanks agian.

    ~Johnny
    A taste of Johnny Bravo’s work: Online Income From Multiple Streams

  • I really enjoyed this post because I have been making it a daily practice to comment on blogs lately. I usually read blog posts in a feed reader program on the iPad, which doesn’t lend itself to commenting. My only interaction with most blogs was through their feeds. I rarely ever saw the blog itself – something for people who create and write on blogs to consider.

    I decided to jump on to some actual blogs and start commenting because I found it was an amazing cure for writer’s block. Of course, this only works if you think through the comment you leave. In many cases, I was able to use a comment I left as a rough draft for a blog post of my own.

    Two Questions for you Ryan:
    1. I have seen people leave their name in the format of “Joe @ My Amazing Blog”. I have done it on sites where others do it as well. What do you think of this practice?

    2. Do you keep track of your comments? If so, what system do you use? I like to keep track of my comments in case someone responds to something I said. I use delicious specifically for keeping track of blogs I like and where I leave comments. It’s not a great system, but since comment “systems” aren’t standard, and I use multiple computers and platforms (iOS devices), delicious covers me. Disqus is the ideal, but most sites don’t use it, so I can’t rely on it. Google Chrome has an extension called Comment Save that logs every comment. But I can’t rely solely on that because it’s PC-dependent.

    Thanks, Dave
    A taste of David Sylvester’s work: 5 Surprising Hobbies That Make Great Businesses

    • David,

      I would only consider doing the Ryan@Awesome thing if it was KeywordLuv enabled. On this blog I scrutinize anyone that does that heavily and Spam most of those comments. Plus if it’s not a KeywordLuv blog then it’s not really helping you anyone.

      I do not track comments. I should… I don’t… I leave probably 7-10 comments a day and I just roll with it.

      I wish I had a great strategy for you but I don’t.

      Thanks for stopping by dude!!

      Hanley

      • Thanks for your reply. I just installed CommentLuv on my site. Regarding comments I leave, I think I’ll heed your advice and just stick with my name.

        You are very good about replying to everyone’s comments. I have noticed that many bloggers either rarely reply or don’t reply at all.

  • Blog commenting certainly works to attract targeted traffic, but you have use these techniques to show your expertise and value when leaving a comment. so that visitors try to find more about you and your blog.

  • Ryan,

    Nice article but after the penguin Google update, commenting on blogs was significantly devalued due to the prevalence of spammers! Commenting on blogs may stir some interest from those involved in the conversation, but it will provide little to no value for search engine optimization… In fact it may harm your website ranking! Don’t count on blogging to increase your SERP, it may in fact harm your ranking…google: does blog commenting hurt search engine ranking after penguin?

    • Jack,

      Thanks for your comments. I don’t agree that anyone taking the time to leave well thought out comments on active blogs is going to be punished by Google. Google reduced the relevance of comment links but a natural growth of comment links does add SEO value.

      But the whole basis behind Just Be Awesome Blog Commenting is building consistent traffic growth through relationships within blog communities.

      Thanks!!

      Ryan H.

      • Hey Ryan,

        Blog commenting can and will harm SERP results, for instance one of my most profitable keywords, after the penguin update, went from the very first position, 1st page of Google to oblivion… after spending about 60 hours of research which included contacting other experts in the search engine optimization field, it became apparent that blog commenting was the culprit! Feel free to do some additional research on this subject. As an insurance agency owner I invest a significant amount of my weekly time immersed in the search engine optimization field specifically for insurance. I have recovered from the Google penalty, but blog commenting was the culprit for my loss of ranking! My insurance web site has more than 200 page 1 listings in Google, for some of my profitable keyword terms I have six positions on the first page of Google! While it’s true at one time blog commenting did in fact help your website ranking, I would exercise extreme caution in blog commenting as Google has devalued these types of links due to the prevalence of spammers!

        • Jack,

          The difference between what I’m saying and what you’re saying is the Goal.

          You’re talking about a blog commenting campaign built as a backlinking strategy to build SERP.

          I’m talking about blog commenting as a way to build relationships and create consistent traffic in that manner.

          I understand that comment links do not have the same juice as they once did. But blog commenting is still an important part of traffic generation.

          Thanks!

        • Ryan,

          I’ve been down the blog commenting road previously attempting to do exactly what you had written in your article for two purposes… One was for back linking, the second purpose was to engage other individuals so that they would potentially network with me and or do business with my agency… For a solid year one of my part-time employees that I trained to do basic search engine optimization would find high-ranking blogs, page rank six and above to post well-thought-out comments… This approach does not work anymore for SERP or networking, especially as Google is penalizing websites for overdoing blog commenting, and adding little to no value for blog commenting if it’s done sporadically. (so essentially you’re wasting your time by blog commenting)

          I applaud your efforts as an insurance agent to encourage other like-minded business owners to engage in discussions about the importance of online marketing…. I too believe that this is the wave of the future for advertising for any business, but blog commenting is a strategy of the past… What you are doing with LinkedIn is different, you are engaging individuals on a social media platform, that’s far more effective in networking compared to blogging.

          Five years ago I made a decision to invest time learning about search engine optimization and online marketing, I’m glad that I did. The online game changes rapidly, as I mentioned to you in previous comments I was severely penalized because of blog commenting on one specific highly profitable keyword… And it happened literally overnight. One day I was on page 1 in the first position, the next day I was completely off the radar map… The search engines are constantly attempting to figure out ways to bypass spammers efforts to game the system, we do not spam to gain SEO ranking. We use something called “white hat” optimization, yet I was penalized because Google decided to change its philosophy on blog comments!

          Here’s the moral of the story:

          It takes a significant amount of time to keep up on all the changes that are occurring in search engine optimization… I personally invest between 30-40 hours each week researching, testing, and tweaking different online strategies….

          Fortunately I have a good staff that can close the sales leads that my insurance agency web site generates for us each week… We are obtaining outstanding results in terms of prospects contacting my office because they found my website when they were typing in specific insurance keywords and our closing ratio is phenomenal… For instance in some commercial lines niches we work we close 80% of the leads we receive from prospects finding us online.

          What we have to remember is that everything changes in search engine optimization, what is effective today is penalized tomorrow. Becoming a student if you have the time will eventually lead you to become a master in the online game… So be prepared to learn, and adjust, when search engines decide to change the rules of the game which they do quite frequently!

  • As I’m soon starting a blog, I find this is such a valuable site to prepare and learn. thanks!
    You nailed it about the interaction. As a musician I have to say that most artists are not getting it – since I don’t blog yet, I see it on Facebook and Twitter. It almost feels like “hey, I am an artist, I don’t have to engage because all my pages are about getting adorers.” Screw them, most will have to smell the coffee as they’ll never be signed to a major label that runs their social media etc.
    By the way – it’s not “your Content Warrior” but “You’re” – is this mistake everyone makes a sign that American school system sucks? (proud to never been gone to school here, lol) kidding.

    • Dacesita,

      That is very good point… Just because you build something doesn’t mean people are going to read it or connect with it… People want the relationship and engagement… That is how you create a raving fan base!

      Thanks and where did you see “your content warrior”? I’d like to fix that.

      Ryan H.

      • Hi Ryan! Yes exactly! The “your content warrior” is at the first check-box whenever you post a comment.

        Hi Marc! could be, but the structure and context of that sentence suggest it’s not a possessive form. “Check this box to confirm your Content Warrior and NOT a spammer” Because there comes “and not a spammer” and not “and not spam” it’s most likely a “you are” not “your”. And why do you check a check-box anyways? To say to a blogger that you posses a Content Warrior and not spam? He couldn’t care less about your possession of a Content Warrior, he cares about not having spam. Content Warrior with capital letters can be either a name, a made-up title or a product/ service. So in this context it smells like a you are=you’re because a made-up title for those who write quality comments fits the best. :P

  • Here I am, commenting on a blog about blog commenting. Welcome to 2012. I’d like to add that when you give a quality comment, the moderator is way less likely to think you’re a bot. Whenever there’s a comment that just seems a little too vague to be related, the instinct is to hit “spam.” Then you aren’t doing any positive link building and joining the bot side.

    • Robert,

      In all honesty I am very heavy handed with the SPAM button. If the comment feels fishy it gets sent to SPAM. But if you’re yourself and act like a human being then no matter what you say I’m going to let it ride.

      Thanks for stopping by!!

      Ryan H.

  • Hey Ryan,
    Great post! :)

    Yes, really! I am impressed by how thorough you made this and I must admit that I completely agree with you.
    In just two months, I have been able to take my blog from an Alexa Traffic Rank of 1,300, 000+ to just a little above 400, 000 where it stands today and I did that with blog commenting as my number 1 strategy.

    When I see popular bloggers like Ileane who still take the time to “be awesome” in the blogosphere, my determination to stick to my commenting strategy is made even stronger.

    Blog commenting works, when we consider commenting as a serious part of our brand strategy. If our comments are thoughtful and of value, people nod and say, “This makes sense!” and naturally they follow your link back to your blog to read more of your thoughts.

    So if you write a comment and read it over and it doesn’t make sense, it may do you a disservice to hit that ‘post comment’ button.
    A taste of Yeremi Akpan’s work: Building Blogging Relationships – Make Each Connection Count

    • Yeremi,

      Leaving awesome comments like this one, which are filled with value and thoughtfulness seem like the #1 reason you’re getting such great traffic numbers.

      And I couldn’t agree with your thoughts more. If you take the time to be awesome and be YOU people respond in a big way.

      Thanks!!

      Ryan H.

  • Hi Ryan, CommentLuv is just the best thing since sliced bread when it comes to commenting. I love how the premium version gives us the fine grain control and when I’m moderating comments I exercise every aspect of that control possible. I remove dofollow, Twitter links, heck I even remove the CommentLuv depending on the nature of the comment. I know that some people aren’t too savvy when it comes to blog commenting but there is a fine art to weeding through those to get to the real comment gold. I do it because I want to help people – but only REAL people. There are times when I see comments that are pretty good, but the person doesn’t use their real name. (Trash)
    I’ve thought about posting a commenting policy, but people ignore those. I know I do. I’ve been using my real name for the past year and a half and stopped adding keywords in the name field a long time ago. I don’t want to send mixed signals with a commenting policy that takes up the whole page!
    The field says “name” so unless I know who you are, it’s best if you leave a name!

    One more point I want to add – you mentioned email address – here’s another tip – Please be sure the email address matches the one you have on your Gravatar account. AND now that Google has evolved with Google+, rel=author and so on – (for best results) the email should also match the same one used on your Google profile.

    Thanks for the post Ryan! Great stuff.
    A taste of Ileane’s work: Getting Your Blog Ready For CommentLuv Premium

    • Ileane,

      Those last two tips are fantastic… I didn’t even think about the Gravatar photo… That is another sign someone might be a Spammer… No picture.

      But I didn’t think about the Google+ connection.

      Appreciate you stopping by and helping with some AWESOME tips!!

      All the best!

      Ryan H.

  • Reply to other commentors is definitely a really helpful way to build visibility and drive traffic back to your blog or website.

    Most people just leave the comment and move on but if you are making an effort to respond to following question, people definitely notice you and want to know more about you.

  • Ryan,
    I would be highly interested in an experiment that discovers how many people are now totally SCARED STIFF to comment on your blog ;) But honestly, you didn’t say you have to have the best comment ever. And I think that’s where many people fall down- they think their comments have to be literature-worthy or not worth writing about all. And that’s a shame.

    Another way to think about it- Leaving a comment that says “Great post” is like you sending an email that does NOT need a response and the recipient responds with “OK!” I know the person means well, but was that really necessary?It sucked away precious minutes. And didn’t add anything of value.

    As a blogger myself, the most valuable comments consistently tell me how the post helped the reader. That’s gold.

    And Ryan, your post showed me that instead of just listing my blog address, I should use the address for the “About”” page. So I’m going to start doing that. Thank you, as always, for working so incredibly hard.
    A taste of Carrie Reynolds’s work: Small Business Owners Guide to Creating Engaging Content on Facebook Pages